Memories of Christmas Past – Putz Houses

IMG_3695The tradition of decorative Christmas villages is rooted in the holiday traditions of the Pennsylvania Dutch. In early-colonial American Moravian homes, the construction of a nativity scene, or putz, at the base of a Christmas tree was a very common holiday activity. The term was derived from the German verb putzen, which means “to clean” or “to decorate.” Although initially placed beneath the Christmas tree, by the early 1800s a family’s “putz” might have also been found on the fireplace mantel, side tables, and other prominent places within the home.

The story of Noah’s Ark, an especially popular subject for a putz, could result in the arranging of several hundred carved animals wending their way towards the ark. By the mid-19th century, more secular figures and scene elements were being added to the putz. In many homes, the putz took more time and energy than the decoration of the family Christmas tree. Separate areas were developed with different themes; spreading outward from the Nativity scene were other farms or village scenes, which had a way of growing larger and more elaborate every year. Eventually, toy trains were added to these miniature worlds.

After World War II, several Japanese companies started mass-producing cardboard or paper houses, churches, and other buildings. These small buildings usually had holes in the back or the bottom through which Christmas lights were placed to provide illumination. The buildings had tiny colored cellophane windows and were decorated with mica-dusted roofs to give the appearance of snow. Since these buildings were made of inexpensive material and were widely available throughout the United States, they became a very popular Christmas decoration.

Christmas Exhibit - by Barb 056