Bites & Bits of History

Join the Mahoning Valley Historical Society for the new Bites and Bits of History Lunch Program.  Bring your lunch to the beautiful Tyler Mahoning Valley History Center on the third Thursday of every month for a historical presentation. These free lunchtime discussions will cover a variety of topics and give you a chance to explore local history in a new way.

Third Thursday of every month at noon.

The daily parking lot on the west side of the building is available for $2.50.  Place money in the numbered slot which corresponds to your parking space in the white box on the Federal Street sidewalk. Do not park in the monthly lot on the east side. Street parking in marked spots is free.    Additional visitor information.

Bring your own lunch, or visit Overture for their $6 Bites and Bits Lunch Special.  Call Overture at 330-744-9900 to place your order.  Coffee, pop, and water are available for purchase at the History Center.

 

April 20: Pictures Worth a Thousand Words: Telling Stories through Photographs
H. William Lawson, MVHS Executive Director
Discover a few of Mr. Lawson’s favorite photographs in the MVHS Archives collection and learn about their content, what time period they reflect, and what is significant about their subject matter.

May 18: Historic Preservation: Architecture is a reflection of the economy, design influences, and trends of the day
Paul Hagman, Local Architect
Learn about the importance of historic and heritage preservation. Heritage preservation does not mean tying the hands of property owners so no changes can be made to the property or freezing a building in time. Rather, its aim is to maintain and increase the value of buildings by keeping their original built form and architectural elements.

June 15: A History of Jewish Youngstown & the Steel Valley
Tom Welsh, Author and Local Historian
Trace the unique history of one of Ohio’s oldest Jewish communities from its humble beginnings into the challenging climate of the new millennium. Founded in the Mahoning Valley during 1837, a tiny settlement of secular German immigrants grew into one of the most influential centers of Jewish life in the Midwest. Home to nationally renowned rabbis and Zionist firebrands alike, the community produced an astonishing array of leaders in an impressive range of fields throughout the twentieth century.